Travis Nicholson

Email:    nicholson@nus.edu.sg
Email:    travis.nicholson@duke.edu
Office:    S14-03-08
Lab:        S14-03-02B
Phone:   +65 6601 6192 (office)

Research Interests

I am an experimental and theoretical physicist at the Centre for Quantum Technologies. I am interested in ultracold atoms, quantum optics, atomic physics, quantum information, quantum metrology, and novel quantum devices.

About Me

I began my physics career in working as an undergraduate scientist in the group of Deborah Jin at JILA, helping to build the first generation of her KRb molecule experiment.

I then performed my PhD research at JILA in the group of Jun Ye, building an atomic clock based on ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. My PhD thesis reported the achievement of the world’s most accurate clock, which neither gains nor loses a second in 15 billion years.

After completing my PhD, I became a postdoctoral fellow at MIT in the groups of Vladan Vuletic and Mikhail Lukin, studying nonlinear quantum optics with Rydberg EIT. During that time my team observed symmetry-protected collisions between photons, and we also realized a trimer molecule of photons.

I am currently a principal investigator at the Centre for Quantum Technologies and an assistant professor of physics at the National University of Singapore.

More Information

Travis Nicholson

Email:    nicholson@nus.edu.sg
Email:    travis.nicholson@duke.edu
Office:    S14-03-08
Lab:        S14-03-02B
Phone:   +65 6601 6192 (office)

Research Interests

I am an experimental and theoretical physicist at the Centre for Quantum Technologies. I am interested in ultracold atoms, quantum optics, atomic physics, quantum information, quantum metrology, and novel quantum devices.

About Me

I began my physics career working as an undergraduate scientist in the group of Deborah Jin at JILA, helping to build the first generation of her KRb molecule experiment.

I then performed my PhD research at JILA in the group of Jun Ye, building an atomic clock based on ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. My PhD thesis reported the achievement of the world’s most accurate clock, which neither gains nor loses a second in 15 billion years.

After completing my PhD, I became a postdoctoral fellow at MIT in the groups of Vladan Vuletic and Mikhail Lukin, studying nonlinear quantum optics with Rydberg EIT. During that time my team observed symmetry-protected collisions between photons, and we also realized a trimer molecule of photons.

I am currently a principal investigator at the Centre for Quantum Technologies and an assistant professor of physics at the National University of Singapore.

More Information